ARCHIPEL CATAMARAN


The sleek twin catamarans, Archipell I & II, offer an excellent value option for those looking for a more economical Galapagos cruise. Both boats offer a high standard of accommodation and have also recently benefited from an extensive re-fit, making them even better value for money.

Each boat has 8 comfortable double or twin-bedded cabins situated on the main deck — all with ocean views, private bathroom and air conditioning. Good food is shared at the large dining table in the main social area, which also doubles as the saloon. The spacious sun deck makes for a great observation platform, or simply somewhere to relax with a cocktail after a busy day spent exploring.

Guests have free use of snorkeling equipment and double sea kayaks. Wet suits are available for hire.

Both Archipell boats offer 4 to 15-day itineraries around the Galapagos Islands.

San Cristobal


Your Galapagos cruise begins on San Cristobal.


Interpretation Center


This useful point of information located in Puerto Baquerizo Moreno was opened in 1998 with the purpose of informing visitors about the origins and geography of the Galapagos islands. The center has different sections depicting the natural and human history of the Galapagos as well as the efforts of conservation of the present.

South Plaza


Many of the Galapagos cruises drop anchor in the narrow channel that runs between North and South Plaza, usually close enough to the cliffs of North Plaza to allow for views of the busy seabird activity there. South Plaza is reached by a short panga ride to the island's flat northern edge where sea lions take command of the landing jetty .


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A large population of land iguanas roam over the confined space feeding on the carpets of succulent sesuvium and the distinctive opuntias that are abundant on the island.

The 25m-high cliffs that rise on the southern edge of the island offer an excellent vantage point from which to watch the great variety of seabirds that take full advantage of the abundant nesting sites afforded by the lava’s many crevices and ledges. Eye level aerobatic displays by piratical magnificent frigate birds, Audubon’s shearwaters and red-billed tropicbirds at times seem too close for comfort. This island is a special treat available on various Galapagos cruises.


Santa Fe:


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The age and isolation of Santa Fé has allowed a number of endemic animals to evolve including the Santa Fé rice rat, gecko and Barrington land iguana.


Many of the Galapagos cruises anchor in the tranquil and idyllic turquoise waters of Barrington Bay, which is the island's only visitor site. The fine white sand beaches are home to many dozing sea lions, particularly juveniles that like nothing better than to frolic with the snorkelers exploring the bay’s varied and extensive marine life. There are some lovely trails up through the giant Optunia forest with many good wildlife viewing opportunities.

North Seymour


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Separated from Baltra by a short, narrow channel, North Seymour is an uplifted lava flow that has formed a plateau of only 1.9 square kilometres. Though small, the island offers a good introduction to the unique plants and animals that can be found on the archipelago. It is here on your Galapagos cruise that you might first witness the piratical behaviour of the frigate birds: dive-bombing and harassing other birds into dropping food or nest building materials before swooping and snatching up the booty in their own beaks.


An interesting circular trail takes you through the low, bushy vegetation so suited to the island's desert-like climate. Endemic plants such as the dwarf Palo Santo and the strikingly shaped opuntias form the backdrop to the constant cycle of mating, nesting and chick rearing. Endearingly comic blue-footed boobies are never more than an arms length away.


Chinese Hat

Less than a quarter of one square kilometer in size, this island gets its name from being shaped like a Chinese hat. The hat shape is best appreciated from the north side. Lava formations can be seen on the western side of the island, formed under the sea and later raised upward, making it possible to observe coral heads on the lava.


Be amazed by the landscapes covered by sea lions’ colonies, marine iguanas, and Galapagos penguins.

Santa Cruz

For many, Santa Cruz is simply a hopping off point on the way to other parts of the archipelago and a way to be connected to the modern world. A little time on the island reveals, however, that it is a destination in its own right with many interesting visitor sites and much to commend it. This island is a must by either Galapagos cruise or by land tour.


One of the most notable of these is the Charles Darwin Research Station, where much of the specialized conservation work and scientific research for the Galapagos are conducted. The best known of these is the captive breeding program for giant tortoises, but the station's broad brief also includes monitoring and control of invasive species, restoring populations of land iguanas and the distinctive opuntia cacti as well as publication education. The station's Van Straalen Hall Visitors Centre is part of that education program and provides a useful introduction to the Galapagos and its physical and living environments and the issues that the archipelago faces.


Though it houses the largest human population in the Galapagos, the small port town of Puerto Ayora is a tranquil spot in which to while away some time after enjoying time at sea on a Galapagos cruise. The large choice of hotels, bars and restaurants often comes as a surprise to visitors, as does the number of animals and birds that have made the town their home, going about their business seemingly oblivious to the human activity around them.


The island is good for exploring the different types of vegetation that can be found in the archipelago: from the coastal arid zone populated by Palo Santo, mesquite trees, opuntia and candelabra cacti to the lush highlands where forests of scalesia are often shrouded in mist and rain. Here, trees drip atmospherically with water and beard moss while orchids, ferns and bromeliads proliferate. These varied environments give rise to the highest bird tally of any of the islands, with many rare and distinct species to be found. Birders and botanists alike will delight in the opportunities that Santa Cruz affords.

Moreno Point

Punta Moreno is located on the north coast of Isabela Island. This site features a trail of approximately 2100 meters that takes visitors through the extensive lava field to then reach the tidal pools and lagoons, populated by flamingos and Galapagos ducks and the mangrove trees, used by other bird species, as the finches. The path leads then back to the coast, where is possible to do a panga ride along the rocky shore to observe the wildlife

Elizabeth Bay

Elizabeth Bay is a marine only visitor site, which means that landings are not allowed, but the site is open for marine activities as snorkeling, panga rides, and kayaking. This site features mangrove coves that include the three species found in Galapagos (the red, white and black mangroves), making it a very good place for a tranquil kayak or panga ride to observe the fauna, which Includes penguins, different species of rays, sea turtles, and white-tipped reef sharks.


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Tagus Cove

There will be dry landing at Tagus Cove, a historical pirate hideaway where names of countless ships are recorded for posterity on the cliff face. Hike through beautiful Galapagos landscapes to Darwin Lake, a saltwater crater lagoon surrounded by tuff stone.


Espinoza Point

After crossing the Bolivar Channel to Fernandina Island, one of the world's most pristine sites, there will be a dry landing at Punta Espinosa.


Strolling along the shoreline, be on the lookout for flightless cormorants, Galapagos sea lions, Galapagos penguins and hawks, sooty colored marine iguanas and bright red-orange Sally Lightfoot crabs.


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Egas Port

Also known as James Bay, this visitor site gets its name from the salt mining company that was started by Mr. Hector Egas in the 1960s, but the costs of bringing the salt to the mainland were too high, and the company closed after a couple of years. Today, Puerto Egas is a popular visitor site, with a trail that lets visitor walk along the beach and then to the nearby lava filed, where fur sea lions hide from the sun in the natural grottos, sharing the space with the Galapagos hawk, lava lizards, and marine iguanas. Puerto Egas is also a very good place for snorkeling or swimming directly from the beautiful beach.

Rabida

Rabida presents a different landscape than the rest of the Galapagos thanks to its red hue, caused by the high concentration of iron oxide in its sand. A wet landing brings visitors to the red beach of Rabida, where a trail leads visitors to the nearby brackish water lagoon, where is possible to observe flamingoes. The trail continues between two tuff cones and the arid vegetation composed mainly of Palo Santo trees and salt bushes, leading to a white coral beach used as a nesting site of sea turtles and located in the other coast of the island. The island is populated by yellow warblers, mockingbirds, finches, Galapagos doves, Galapagos hawks and brown pelicans.

Bachas Beach

The name Bachas comes from the local pronunciation of 'barges,' two of which were left by the American army on these shores after World War II. This visitor site has a delightful, long beach perfect for swimming or for taking a stroll to observe the wildlife. Behind the beach, there is a saltwater lagoon where is usual to find great blue herons and small waders such as sanderlings. The beach is a nesting area for green sea turtles, which leave tracks in the sand after burying their eggs, especially from November to February.

Baltra Airport

The tour concludes on Baltra Island.

Baltra Airport

Your Galapagos cruise begins on Baltra, a small island that is home to the archipelago’s main airport. Baltra was used as a U.S. military base in WWII and is now a base for Ecuador’s armed forces.

Mosquera

Mosquera is a small islet between Baltra and North Seymour. It measures approximately 160 meters across and 600 meters longe. The is home to one of the largest sea lion colonies and is also a haven for shorebirds. Orcas occasionally come to the islet to feed on the sea lions.

Darwin Bay

The horseshoe-shaped island of Genovesa is one of the youngest in the archipelago being a mere one million years old. Famous for its many species of birds, including the world’s largest colony of red-footed boobies,the island is a paradise for birdwatchers. Being the only island north of the equator to allow visitors makes it an even more special and coveted destination.

Prince Philip's Steps (El Barranco)

After lunch disembark at Prince Philip's Steps locally known as El Barranco, a series of steep, rough-hewn steps in the cliff face, which you climb to follow a path through busy seabird colonies to a forest of Palo Santo. At the end of the path is revealed the highly impressive sight of over 200,000 pairs of Galapagos storm petrels seemingly all taking to the skies at the same time.


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Bartolome and Sullivan

Bartolomé, a favorite stop on any Galapagos cruise passing through this part of the archipelago, is formed by two cinder cones joined by an idyllic, lush green isthmus fringed by storybook-like golden beaches. It is around here that most of the wildlife is to be found, the rest of the island being too harsh an environment for all but the most pioneering and hardy of species.


The impressive panoramic vista of the surrounding bays and islands is probably one of the best in the Galapagos and makes the 114m climb to the summit of the island well worth the effort.


The top is reached via a wooden boardwalk designed to protect the fragile lava from the feet of enthusiastic visitors. The surreal, Mars-like landscape of lava tunnels and spatter cones is broken only by early colonisers such as matplants, lava cacti and the lava lizards that dart over the red-brown surface of the volcano.

The impressive panoramic vista of the surrounding bays and islands is probably

Back down at sea level, good visibility means that excellent snorkelling is to be found in the two bays while a gentle panga ride around the foot of the rocks often affords great opportunities to watch the endearing behaviour of the world’s only tropical penguin – the Galapagos penguin.


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This site also has a small beach used for swimming and snorkel and is a very good place to see the Galapagos penguins.


For many, Santa Cruz is simply a hopping off point on the way to other parts of the archipelago and a way to be connected to the modern world. A little time on the island reveals, however, that it is a destination in its own right with many interesting visitor sites and much to commend it. This island is a must by either Galapagos cruise or by land tour.


One of the most notable of these is the Charles Darwin Research Station, where much of the specialized conservation work and scientific research for the Galapagos are conducted. The best known of these is the captive breeding program for giant tortoises, but the station's broad brief also includes monitoring and control of invasive species, restoring populations of land iguanas and the distinctive opuntia cacti as well as publication education. The station's Van Straalen Hall Visitors Centre is part of that education program and provides a useful introduction to the Galapagos and its physical and living environments and the issues that the archipelago faces.


Though it houses the largest human population in the Galapagos, the small port town of Puerto Ayora is a tranquil spot in which to while away some time after enjoying time at sea on a Galapagos cruise. The large choice of hotels, bars and restaurants often comes as a surprise to visitors, as does the number of animals and birds that have made the town their home, going about their business seemingly oblivious to the human activity around them.


The island is good for exploring the different types of vegetation that can be found in the archipelago: from the coastal arid zone populated by Palo Santo, mesquite trees, opuntia and candelabra cacti to the lush highlands where forests of scalesia are often shrouded in mist and rain. Here, trees drip atmospherically with water and beard moss while orchids, ferns and bromeliads proliferate. These varied environments give rise to the highest bird tally of any of the islands, with many rare and distinct species to be found. Birders and botanists alike will delight in the opportunities that Santa Cruz affords.

Cormorant Point and Devil´s Crown

Spend the day on Floreana, one of the few islands that have a fresh water source, the main reason it was home to European colonists including the eccentric Baroness Von Wagner de Bousquet among others who eventually mysteriously disappeared.


There will be a wet landing onto the olivine beach or Punta Cormorant where you can observe Greater Flamingos in the brackish lagoon on the way to another special beach with the finest sand you'll ever set foot on. It is a sea turtle nesting ground where sharks and rays also visit regularly.


Our last activity of the morning will be a short panga ride to snorkel at Devil's Crown, an old volcanic crater and one of the best snorkeling sites on the itinerary.

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Post Office Bay

After lunch there will be a wet landing to visit Post Office Bay, an interesting part of the human history of the island. Here is where you can leave postcards in the large barrel just as the whalers did centuries ago and also select cards to hand deliver when you return home.

Suarez Point

In the morning you will head to Suarez Point, one of the most popular landing sites in Galapagos. The highlights of this visit include sea lions near the landing place, sometimes seen body‐surfing in the large breakers, large marine iguanas, with red‐colored males in the breeding season, oystercatchers, blue-footed and Nazca boobies, Galapagos hawks, Galapagos doves, swallow‐tailed gulls, red-billed tropicbirds, and three species endemic to Española: the waved albatross (present only from April to December), the Española mockingbird, and the Española lava lizard. The trail ends in El Soplador, a blowhole that sprays water some 25 m (75 feet) into the air.


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Gardner Bay,Gardner Islet & Osborn Islet

Spend the afternoon in the fantastic Gardner Bay (wet landing) of Española Island. There is an outstanding white sand beach with many sea lions present along with marine iguanas,and the intrepid Española mockingbird. Close to Española, there is a good spot for snorkeling called Gardner Islet. While snorkeling, there is a good chance playful sea lions will join you. Get ready for more snorkeling at Osborn islet, a great place to observe great quantities of marine life.

Pitt Point

Punta Pitt (Pitt Point) is located in the northeastern tip of San Cristobal Island and is the only place in the archipelago where is possible to see the 3 different species of boobies (blue-footed, red-footed and masked) as well as the 2 species of frigate birds sharing a common space. The site has a trail that goes up a cliff and through a ravine, leading to an area with abundant birdlife. This site is also known for being a good snorkeling spot of San Cristobal Island.

Cerro Brujo

Located on the northern coast of San Cristobal Island, Witch Hill is an eroded tuff cone surrounded by a beautiful white powdery sand beach with an abundance of animals. Wildlife includes sea turtles, rays, pelicans, sea lions and various types of boobies. The clear water provides an excellent opportunity for swimming and snorkeling. This was also one of the first places visited by Charles Darwin during his trip in the M/S Beagle.

Lobos Islet

Lobos Island is located near San Cristobal, in the southern part of the Archipelago. This visitor site has a trail of 850 meters that crossed almost all of the island. There is a small population of blue-footed boobies and common frigate birds nesting at this site, that is also inhabited by the two species of sea lions present in the archipelago. This is also a great site for snorkeling, as the waters are calm and not so deep, so it’s common to see juvenile sea lions, manta rays, and sea turtles.

San Cristobal Airport

The tour concludes on San Cristóbal Island. The aiport is located in the capital of the Galapagos province, Puerto Baquerizo Moreno.

Archipell Catamaran Deck Plan

Main Deck

archipell catamaran main deck

Lower Deck

archipell catamaran lower deck

Sun Deck

archipell catamaran sun deck

For up-to-the-minute rates & special promotions, please contact us.


All rates will be quoted per person based on double occupancy unless otherwise specified.
Single supplement: 100%

Rates for this catamaran include:

  • Accommodation in double cabins with private bathroom, hot water and air conditioning
  • Naturalist, Galapagos National Park certified bilingual guide (English – Spanish)
  • Meals on board
  • Coffee, tea and water
  • Snacks after each activitiy
  • Use of snorkel equipment
  • Use of sea kayaks
  • Quito airport assistance (dispatch)

Rates do not include:

  • Round trip airfare to/from Galapagos (we issue tickets)
  • INGALA transit control card: $20
  • Galapagos National Park entrance fee for non-residents: $100
  • Use of wet suits
  • Extra beverages on board
  • Tips
  • Personal expenses

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